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    Looking for a job in other countries involves translating your university qualifications, in some cases, and also preparing a curriculum vitae and cover letter. There are familiar models throughout Europe, such as the Europass curriculum, which is a document that helps to present your skills and qualifications in a clear and effective way and allows you, through a template, to create your curriculum in the European Union language of your choice, However, is just producing one version and translating it into other languages enough? Are you sure that what you have written in another language does not have any spelling mistakes?

    Do we need to adapt our CV or cover letter to the specific market?

    You no doubt know the theory: first your personal details, then your experience ordered from the most recent to the oldest, then your academic qualifications. However, not all countries look for the same information when recruiting staff. For example, did you know that in the United Kingdom you do not have to include your date of birth or even attach a cover letter at times? And that they use capital letters more and do not include a photo? Or that in France, especially for men, people should specify in their curriculum vitae whether or not they have performed military service? Or that if you want to work for a Chinese company, you must indicate your marital statusheight and ethnic group? 

    It is always good to ask someone to review your curriculum vitae and that is why at Okodia Translation Services we have set up a practical service to translate and review curriculum vitae in 24 hoursOur professional translators can review your curriculum vitae and cover letter to check that they do not contain any grammatical errors, translate them or even adapt them to the specific market. Easy, convenient and simple. Visit https://www.iuratum.es!

    Of course, nowadays just having an up-to-date CV is not usually enough. The professional world now moves in clicks, recommendations and the number of times a post has been shared. This is the bread and butter of one of the most reputable professional networking sites: LinkedIn. It’s surely crossed your mind at least once: Should I translate my LinkedIn profile? And why not? The profiles of companies and professionals that are in more than one language double their visibility on this site, which is surely something that you can turn to your advantage.

    Why translate your LinkedIn profile?

    A LinkedIn profile should speak to internauts, which in this case are your customers and potential customers. Have you ever taken a moment to think about what language they speak? You should, especially if you wish to achieve your goals and you want your profile to appear in their search results. LinkedIn allows you to create a profile in many languages—in fact, in more than 20! But you should translate your LinkedIn profile into every language. There are those who have the same profile in several languages; but this makes it rather difficult to read and understand. If you wish to reach customers in other countries, because your company is seeking new opportunities in other parts of the world, having a company page or a professional profile in LinkedIn translated into the languages of those countries is a testament to the company’s firm commitment.

    Translating your LinkedIn profile will allow you to also appear in LinkedIn’s search results in the language in which your profile has been translated into. For example, if you have your profile in Spanish, English and French, these profiles would appear in the results of that search, as they would be optimized for it, with suitable keywords in important places and with optimal keyword density, which would be quite difficult if you only had a profile in either Spanish or English.  LinkedIn would show the English, French or Spanish version of your profile because the interface of the one performing the search would be in one of these languages.  

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    Sonia

    Author Sonia

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