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    Although she has a degree in Tourism, for more than nine years, Ana, originally from Rioja, has also been part of the small but perfectly formed Okodia family. She is one of our project managers, so she is often one of the first people in our translation agency to have contact with our customers. She loves her job and works hard to make sure that she does it well. She loves to travel and sleep and she spends her free time playing and walking with her young daughter and her dog.

    – What do you like most about your daily work?

    In terms of the work itself, the direct and close yet electronic relationship with people, both the customers and the translators and colleagues. In relation to the working conditions, being able to work from home.

    – Why are you interested in the world of translation?

    It’s a really interesting world. It is the ability to adapt a text so that someone who does not speak your language and may even have a different culture can understand it.

    – What is the strangest thing that has happened to you in the time you have been working at Okodia?

    The thing that is very curious, strange and pleasant at the same time is when a customer congratulates you! Normally, in the world of translation, as in any other, we are good at complaining but not so good at giving praise when something is done well, so when we receive congratulations from our customers it gives us a buzz.

    – How would you describe the world of translation?

    It’s a really interesting world and quite underrated. People outside this world do not realise the great work involved in producing a translation. They sometimes think that the work is pretty automatic, translating word by word. However, in reality the essence of the content must be transferred from one language to another adding the necessary connotations so that the message makes sense in the culture it is aimed at.

    – Some people say that the world of translation is very complicated. After many years working at Okodia, do you agree with that?

    Yes, it is quite difficult. People believe that translating only requires you to know a language. For a simple text that might be the case, but to translate a slightly more specialised text you need a lot of preparation and resources and will have to do a lot of reading and research.

    – What advice would you give companies thinking about whether or not to translate their content?

    My advice is to go for it. Their products will reach a much larger audience, so the investment they make in translation will be more than recovered by increasing their customers.

    – How has the situation caused by Covid-19 changed your daily work at the company?

    Fortunately, I have not been greatly affected by the situation. Our company is a pioneer in teleworking, so we have not had to stop working at any time. In addition, we were initially afraid that we would see a fall in business, since if companies reduce their activity, they will also reduce their translation requests. However, what is taken away with one hand is given with the other, as we have seen a large volume of translation requests relating to the disease.

    “Chinese amazes me”

    – What’s the most important thing you have done in your life?

    Having my little girl and I would love a second child.

    – What are your greatest achievements?

    I think my greatest achievement is having a job that I like and the ability to disconnect from it as soon as my workday ends. That allows me to focus on my personal life, which I also love.

    – A country where you would like to live.

    I wouldn’t live anywhere but Spain, but I would go somewhere by the beach and with warm weather.

    – Is there a language that particularly catches your attention? Why?

    Chinese amazes me because in addition to knowing how to write, you have to know how to draw, something that would be really difficult for me.

    – Have you ever set yourself a goal or objective but failed to achieve it? 

    Learning to play the piano. I spent a few years taking piano lessons but I couldn’t get the hang of it. I think there are things you have to be born to do and being a pianist was clearly not my destiny.

    Rocío González

    Author Rocío González

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